Calendar

<<  July 2017  >>
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
262728293012
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31123456

View posts in large calendar

New Drug Debuts On Local College Campus

From KWQC.com (Davenport, IA):

It's the first of its kind on the Knox college campus according to college police. They say officers were alerted about a student who had ingested the drug and was a psychotic episode and needing help. After investigating, campus police decided to inform the entire community through a drug alert.

Some of the students responded immediately by handing over the rest of the drug paraphernalia used by the hospitalized student. Galesburg Police chief David Christensen says the drug is called 25-I. It's a synthetic drug that mimics the effects of LSD while leaving its user in distress and experiencing hallucinations. Christensen says it's a the first for this drug being in the area.

Posted: 1/30/2014 11:00:00 AM

Tags: , , , ,

New drug-driving law will affect some prescription medicines

From WebMD:

It is illegal to drive or to attempt to drive while impaired by alcohol or drugs. This is because drinking alcohol, or taking illegal drugs or some prescription medicines, can affect someone’s ability to drive safely. This summer, the government plans to update and clarify the law about ‘drug-driving’. It will state exactly which drugs are affected, and it will be an offence to drive if you have taken more than a specified level of that drug.

Although the list of drugs affected by the law will still mainly contain so-called ‘recreational’ drugs - things like cannabis, cocaine, heroin, and ecstasy - there are some names on it that people will recognise as medicines. The prescription medicines on the list include methadone, morphine, and benzodiazepines including diazepam and temazepam.

People taking medicines prescribed by their doctor shouldn’t have any difficulty. The new law will state that people who take prescription drugs will have a legal defence (that means it’s not likely they will be prosecuted) as long as:

--they haven’t been taking more than the recommended dose of their medicine, and
--they haven’t gone against the advice about their medicine given in the manufacturer’s information leaflet.

Doctors are already well aware of which prescription drugs can affect people’s ability to drive - usually by making them drowsy. And doctors should make sure people who use these prescription medicines know about how these drugs might affect them.

Posted: 1/28/2014 10:51:00 AM

Tags: , , , ,

Painkiller-spiked heroin kills at least 17 in Pittsburgh region

From the New York Daily News:

Tainted heroin killed as many as 17 people in the region in the past seven days, including five suspected overdoses since Friday, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported.

Authorities say the killer dope is spiked with the powerful narcotic, fentanyl, and is being sold in baggies stamped with the word "Theraflu."

Allegheny County medical examiner Karl Williams said his office typically sees 250 fatal overdoes at year.

At this rate, the county was looking at somewhere in the neighborhood of 800 deaths for 2014.

The rash of deaths brought to mind an epidemic of deadly “China White” heroin in the late 80s that killed nearly 20 and led to dozens more overdoses.

“China White” also contained fentanyl.

Posted: 1/27/2014 12:35:00 PM

Tags: , , , ,

Scary New Drug 'Krokodil' Seen for First Time in Texas

From WOAI (Texas):

The Texas DEA tells 1200 WOAI news that it has experienced the first case of a Texan being treated for using a new type of drug which leaves the user with flesh lesions and turns the skin a scaly green color.

The 17 year old girl from Houston checked into a hospital in the Mexican state of Jalisco, where she had gone to visit relatives over the holidays. She was complaining of digestive problems, and doctors notices the fresh skin lesions and diagnosed the drug use.

Officials say the girl told them that she obtained and ingested krokadil in Houston. DEA agents are now keeping an eye on Texas emergency rooms, to see if any more cases pop up here.

Researchers say Russian chemists cooked up the homemade concoction, using the prescription painkiller codeine, along with other scary chemicals including gasoline and phosphorus.

Posted: 1/6/2014 9:36:00 AM

Tags: , , , ,