Calendar

<<  April 2017  >>
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
1234567

View posts in large calendar

Police warn against deadly new street drug W-18

From Radio Canada International:

W-18 is a synthetic opioid considered to be 10,000 times more powerful than morphine and 100 time stronger than fentanyl—a street drug which caused about 270 overdose deaths last year in the province of Alberta alone.

Four kilograms of a white powder seized by police in the Edmonton area in December 2015 was analysed and turns out to be W-18, a drug that is not yet a controlled substance in Canada.

The quantity is enough to produce millions of tablets, say police. Minute amounts can be deadly. Police are concerned that illicit labs creating tablets may not cut the drug properly and that overdoses will result.

Hospitals have been warned to be on the lookout for drug overdoses and deaths that might be linked to W-18. Dr. Laura Calhoun of the government of Alberta health service joined with police to warn the public: “Our message to the public is this: no matter what drug you use, fentanyl or W-18 may be hiding in it, and they may kill you.”

New synthetic drug shows up on streets of Northeast Ohio

From newsnet5 (Cleveland):

There is new drug is on the streets of Northeast Ohio and it can be deadly.

In fact, an overdose death in Lake County is believed to be the first in the state, said Doug Rohde, supervisor of Chemistry and Toxicology at the Lake County Crime Laboratory.

After an alert from Lorain County about a new drug and some more research Rohde discovered it was U-47700. It is a new opioid that is eight times more potent than morphine. It is also deadly. U-47700 is to blame for the deaths of 20 people in 9 states.

The synthetic opioid is so new that it has not yet been labeled illegal. But, Rohde said just because it is still legal does not mean that it is safe.

Cheap Blood Pressure Medication Could Help Alcoholics

From The American Council on Science and Health (ACSH):

Unhealthy alcohol use is unfortunately very prevalent, not just here in the United States, but worldwide. It is estimated that 3.8 percent of all worldwide deaths are attributable to alcohol addiction.

Despite alcohol’s significant contribution to morbidity and mortality, there is still a paucity of effective treatments available for individuals suffering from alcoholism. New research, however, provides a glimmer of hope. A recently published study in the journal Addiction Biology, the Journal of the Society for the Study of Addiction, researchers believe that the drug pindolol, a relatively cheap blood pressure medication, has been shown to be effective in preclinical trials.

“Drugs currently used for AUDs (alcohol use disorders) – acamprosate, naltrexone and disulfiram – have limited success, so this is a ground-breaking development with enormous potential,” stated Selena Bartlett, a professor of neuroscience from Queensland Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation. “In an internationally-significant breakthrough, our study showed pindolol was able to reduce ethanol/alcohol consumption, particularly in relation to binge drinking, a key behavior observed in human alcohol dependence.”


Posted: 4/15/2016 11:48:00 AM

Tags: ,

Synthetic opiate makers stay step ahead of US drug laws as overdose cases rise

From The Guardian:

W-18 is one of thousands of synthetic opiates that is not scheduled as a controlled substance and thus not subject to criminal drug penalties, and one of a handful of drugs that law enforcement officials and scientists say they have seen in increasing numbers in the last six months, as use, abuse and overdose deaths continues to rise.

Another, U-47700, which is seven to eight times stronger than morphine, has been the source of overdoses over the past year in at least 10 states since the first US incident was discovered in Knoxville, Tennessee, in June 2015.

Barry Logan, the executive director for the Center of Forensic Science and Education, said his lab has been able to track down 17 overdose cases of U-47700. And several other overdose deaths and hospitalizations have been identified by local law enforcement in Florida and northern Texas.

The uptick in overdoses and drug seizures involving opiates like W-18 and U-47700 follows actions taken by the Chinese government to criminalize more than 100 chemicals on 1 October 2015, according to Bare.

Once more traditional synthetic drugs were outlawed, chemists looked to more novel substances instead.

The banned chemicals included the makings of acetyl fentanyl, an illicit version or analogue of the powerful prescription painkiller fentanyl that is drastically exacerbating the opioid epidemic in the US. Flakka, a cathinone similar to bath salts, was also banned.

Logan said chemists are finding the recipes for these drugs from research books from the 1970s, when scientists were trying to invent alternatives to morphine.

“In order to find one drug like that you have to test hundreds of them,” said Logan. The result is that there are thousands of variations of research opiates, most of which were never meant to be tried on humans.